Healthy Alaskans 2020

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Actions for Success

Process

Team Organization

Contact:

healthyalaskans@alaska.gov

State of Alaska -
Division of Public Health
Lisa DH Aquino, MHS
Community Health Improvement Manager
3601 C Street
Anchorage, AK 99503
(907)269-3456


Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium - Division of
Community Health Services

Emily Read
Operations Director
3900 Ambassador Drive, Suite 401
Anchorage, AK 99508
(907) 729-3941


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Evidence-based Strategies:
11. Reduce child maltreatment

Alaska Strategies

  1. Promote screening and monitoring for child abuse in primary care offices and public health clinics.

  2. Use the Strengthening Families Protective Factors framework in family programs.

  3. Expand home visiting programs.

  4. Expand and strengthen quality early childhood programs.

  5. Train providers on brain development, adverse childhood experiences (ACES), and resiliency.

Click here for detailed information about these strategies.


Other Strategies

Essentials for Childhood: Steps to Create Safe, Stable and Nurturing Relationships

Description: Essentials for Childhood: Steps to Create Safe, Stable and Nurturing Relationships. Hospital-based abusive head trauma prevention approaches.

Specific Programs/Strategies: These programs give parents of newborns information about the serious adverse effects of shaking an infant and offer guidance on how to handle a crying infant and avoid shaking. The information is provided before parents take the baby home from the hospital after delivery.

Child FIRST

Description: A home visitation program for low-income families with young children at high risk of emotional, behavioral, or developmental problems, or child maltreatment

Specific Programs/Strategies: Home visitation program for low-income families with children ages 6-36 months at high risk of emotional, behavioral, or developmental problems, or child maltreatment, based on child screening and/or family characteristics such as maternal depression.

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT)

Description: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). PCIT improves the quality of parent-child relationships and changes how parents and children interact with one another. Parents learn specific skills to build a nurturing and secure relationship with their children while increasing their children’s desirable behavior and decreasing negative behavior. Coaches work directly with parent-child pairs to help them learn new skills. In addition to impacting CM outcomes, this program has shown improvements in parenting behavior and child behavior problems.

Specific Programs/Strategies: As an assessment-driven treatment, PCIT is guided by weekly data from the ECBI and DPICS. These well-standardized instruments are supplemented by additional measures the clinician-may select for careful tracking of individual presenting complaints of families during treatment.

Triple P (Positive Parenting Program)

Description: Triple P (Positive Parenting Program) is a system of parenting and family support to address parents’ varied needs.

Specific Programs/Strategies: Five levels of intervention range from media strategies to increase awareness and acceptance, to brief consultation on common developmental issues, to intensive approaches to address problems with parenting and child behavior. In addition to impacting CM outcomes, this program has shown improvements in parenting behavior and child behavior problems.

  • Target Audience: Children
  • Setting: School (daycare), Clinical
  • Recommendation: Shown to prevent child maltreatment
  • Review Agency: CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Essentials for Childhood: Steps to Create Safe, Stable and Nurturing Relationships
  • Related Topics: Not applicable
  • Website: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT)

Nurse-Family Partnership

Description: Not available.

Specific Programs/Strategies:  A nurse home visitation program for first-time mothers – mostly low-income and unmarried – during their pregnancy and children’s infancy.

  • Target Audience: Children
  • Setting: Community
  • Recommendation: Top Tier
  • Review Agency: Coalition for EB Policy; ASTHO, Promising Practices Network
  • Related Topics: Poverty LHI #24
  • Website: Nurse-Family Partnership

Community Advocacy Project (CAP)

Description: The Community Advocacy Project (CAP) provides advocacy and individually tailored assistance to women who have been physically and/or emotionally abused by intimate partners as well as to their children, who may have been bystanders in abusive situations. CAP's objectives of eliminating or reducing the risk of future abuse and improving participants' quality of life are premised on the women gaining empowerment and coping skills, obtaining social support, and recognizing and using community resources.

Specific Programs/Strategies: The intervention is composed of five phases: 1) Gather information regarding the needs and goals of each participant and her child. 2) The advocate and the participant generate, mobilize, and access community resources. 3) Regular check-in with the participant to determine whether her unmet needs have been fulfilled. 4) If the community resources were ineffective, alternative strategies resources are suggested. 5) During the last few weeks of the intervention, the advocate focuses intensively on transfering skills and knowledge to the participant, ensuring that she no longer needs the advocate at the end of the intervention.